Tag: Aging

Maintaining Physical Health

Physical Health

Aging naturally affects physical health. Maintaining ones physical condition takes more effort as each decade passes by. But the benefits of taking an active approach are many. The various body systems gain from good physical health. Of course both exercise and diet are key elements needed to keep the body in tune.

Ten years ago my body was aging fast. Even though I walked two miles most days, I had gained weight and my digestive system was a mess. My gastroenterologist prescribed some medicine to treat the ulcerative colitis. But the best thing he gave me was advice. He told me my body was used to the walks around the park. He said I needed to step it up a bit. So I began training for a marathon.
I trained a full year for the 2010 Marine Corps Marathon. My physical fitness level needed all that time to get ready. The best side effect was the positive reaction in my intestinal system. Since, I was serious about the training I stopped drinking colas and other carbonated beverages. This change in diet also contributed to better physical health.

Sugar and Fat

The carbonated beverages contained lots of sugar. Please read the book review The Case Against Sugar. In addition to watching sugar, I also watch my fats. I have been drinking 1% milk for over a decade. This change from whole milk has kept my cholesterol levels in check. Now, my biggest challenge is to not eat too much cheese.

Because I am a decade older, I have personally ruled out additional marathons. In fact, I have not run a half marathon in almost two years. Unfortunately, this has had a negative reaction for my digestive system. But, my heart rate gets above where it should be if I run too far. Thus I am experiencing a bit of a Catch-22. (A good book by the way.) So, I need to find other ways to maintain good physical health.

I now keep track of my heart rate when I exercise. This leads to many run/walk outings. Fortunately, the alternation between walking and running is akin to the interval training of my track days. Since I live at altitude, my trips to the East Coast let me run a bit farther. I plan to do any future half marathons at sea level. If my heart rate gets too high, I will make myself walk part of the course.

Brain Health

The physical activity also helps my brain health. First, the exercise releases many hormones. For an informative article on exercise and beneficial hormone release please click here. I am particularly hopeful that the more intense workouts release enough Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor to grow some new cells. I need all the new growth I can get.

Some early studies show consistent aerobic exercise increases the size of the hippo-campus. One study by the University of British Columbia was limited to women. The hippocampal volume grew over the course of the experiment. Unfortunately, the results were mixed with respect to memory. The study cited possible interference by white matter as a cause. You can access the study by clicking here.

Check-ups

Regular check-ups are key. Plane travel has been affecting my right eye. It becomes blurry and a headache ensues. Recently, my annual eye exam verified my sometimes blurry right eye was a cause for concern. I have a cataract. While I am apprehensive about the surgery, I know this condition can be addressed.

Each year I have blood work done. A couple of springs ago I was surprised that my thyroid levels were off. It is a hereditary disease. But both my parents are symptom free. However, I began treatment and feel much better. Last summer I discovered my father’s brother takes the same medicine. Since my paternal grandparents died relatively young the possibility of the condition was unknown. So, it helps to know beyond just the immediate family even though the odds diminish.

Maintaining physical health can aid in the quality of life. Eating right and exercising are the two components I focused on today. Other things come into play when discussing longevity such as social connectedness and spiritual life. Both are potential topics for future posts.

Since I need to alter my workouts, please let me know your choice of exercise.

Aging Doesn’t Equal Lifestyle Slow Down

Recently I picked up a Time Magazine at a check-out counter. The cover was a maze. The extra content covered longevity. Many of the articles are interesting and a couple seem to be directed toward me. I am aging and my lifestyle has changed but I don’t seem to be slowing down.

This past weekend is a good example. On Friday afternoon, I used spray paint to mark the rows as discussed in the book review of Raised Row Gardening. On Saturday, I oversaw the unfortunate need of rototilling. Only the eighteen inch beds were tilled. I am not one for machinery hence the overseeing.

True Test

Sunday came the true test for my aging body. I engaged in very physical labor from just before nine a.m. until five p.m. with a thirty minute break for lunch. First I made three trips to a Tractor Supply because the local farmer I contacted was out of straw. Three trips with four bales at a time in the back of the Subaru Outback. Each trip ended with hauling the bales to the plot of land lined out for the garden.

Then the real labor began. My location on the High Plains is in the midst of a major drought. To be honest, we have been living with different levels of water restrictions for at least ten years. Thus the ground is not easy to turn even after two passes with a rototiller.

I did not rototill the walkway areas. No need in my mind since no growth is desired there. Because of another ongoing project, I have excess topsoil to work with.

Each of the four growing rows measures eighteen inches by forty feet. Yes, forty feet. I may be aging but I still love working in my garden. I am counting on the folks at Old World Garden Farms and this raised row method to make the work easier with each passing year. But this first year is labor intensive.

I raked the loose dirt up the sides of each row. Then I shoveled the center in order to make a nice even ten inch base within the eighteen inch area. Next, I layered a six inch thickness of straw in the ten inch area. I raked the side dirt back in and then shoveled more topsoil over to form a nice mound. Often, wheelbarrows of dirt were added from one of two nearby piles.

The final step was to put a four inch layer of straw on the walkway areas. Since the wind kicked up in the late afternoon and was predicted to get stronger, I elected to water down the garden instead of lining the final two walkways. Dusk accompanied me into the house.

Stretching

Then, I did something good for my aging body. I stretched. I use Stretching by Bob Anderson as a reference guide. After the long day of work, I followed the stretches recommended for Indoor and Outdoor Work as well as those for Lower Back Tension.

The stretching I think is a key for the aging body. On Monday morning I did a few stretches and went about a normal day. Light housework with lots of laundry and vacuuming. I also wore a brace on the one ankle which has been giving me trouble. But no major pain.

In addition to the stretching, I think the absence of pain is psychological. I really want to expand my garden and I want to lay the groundwork properly. Therefore, the work is worthwhile. Some slight stiffness is expected. Slight is the significant adjective. No painkillers needed.

The articles in Time magazine reflect my weekend experience. The small snippets described individuals actively engaged in living. One anecdote was of a woman who ran her first marathon at the age of 69.  The reporting also discussed the need for community and social relationships.

Each of the five Blue Zones discussed by the Time article stress healthy living. Dan Buettner is the author of The Blue Zones. Ingredients for a healthy life include exercise, healthy food sources (such as straight from the garden), social circles, spirituality, and a good amount of sleep. Individuals in these areas of longevity not only live longer, but as the Time article states, they live better.

Online Communities

Even though the article did not discuss the online community, I believe that blogs and in my case blogging will also contribute to aging well. I follow several blogs and comment from time to time. I enjoy the comments (as well as the likes) on Econogal. I love going to lunch with a friend, but I also enjoy trading successful canning techniques online with individuals I may never meet. The same holds true with the book reviews.

We live in a changing world. People are living longer. Now the challenge is to make those extra years meaningful. Aging is one thing, aging well is yet another.

Aging Doesn’t Equal Lifestyle Slow Down

  • Empty lot
    Plot for future raised bed garden