The Nightingale Book Review

Book Cover of the NightingaleKristin Hannah is an author that I first became aware of two years ago. So I am slowly progressing through her works. The Nightingale is among my favorites of her books. The story is typical of Hannah with a present day look at characters with the bulk of their story in the past.

Even though the novel opens in Oregon, most of the tale takes place in France. The lives of two sisters, one born prior to The Great War and the other after, are followed as France enters World War II. Both the age difference as well as the varied life experience impacts how each sister views the occupation.

Vianne

Vianne, the elder sister, was fourteen when her mother died. She and her sister Isabelle, a young child at the time were farmed out by their father. Instead of growing closer, the two girls grew apart. Thus they have very diverse lives at the outbreak of war.

Married with a child, Vianne loathes and fears the oncoming conflict. She and her husband reside in a rural part of France. Her closest friend Rachel is Jewish. This becomes an important part of Vianne’s story. Kristin Hannah conveys the danger for both those that are Jewish as well as those who sympathize with them.

The Nightingale

Isabelle Rossignol is just coming to age as the war approaches. A feeling of abandonment shapes her personality. She barely remembers her mother, and feels rejected by her older sister who married just a few years after their mother’s death. Her father shipped her from one place to another as she grew up.

After a dismissal from yet another boarding school she returns to her father. Thus Isabelle is in Paris when the occupation begins. She is ready for adventure. So it is natural that she joins the resistance.

Kristin Hannah

For those unfamiliar with Hannah’s writing, her books fall into that category of hard to put down. The Nightingale fits this description. Somewhat lengthy, readers may want to pick a weekend to begin the book. Otherwise, bedtime might be pushed to the limit.

The interweaving of tales is well done. In fact, the changing of directions may allow the reader to survive the tension and suspense. World War II in occupied France is brought to life by the author. The current story set in America adds to the mystery and provides an understanding at the end. Families are torn apart for many reasons. They can reunite if the circumstances are compelling. War creates compelling circumstances.

Hannah’s books are deep. The writing has meaning on so many levels. For instance, The Nightingale, the code name for one of the spies, translates from the French “rossignol”. The question for the reader is which one of the Rossignol family members is the Nightingale.

The novel runs the gamut of emotion. Thus, I was not surprised to learn a movie is in the works. I encourage you to read the Nightingale. Then look for the movie in theatres starting January 2019. I am not much of a movie goer, but I look forward to seeing Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale brought to the screen.

One thought on “The Nightingale Book Review

Tell me your thoughts:

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.