Tag: Easter

April 2020 Wrap-Up

Fair warning: The topics in the April 2020 Wrap-Up are about as eclectic as they come. It has been a whirlwind stay-at-home month. I actually left my home four times. However, on two occasions I did not leave the vehicle. Both times we drove through for a take-out dinner.

Essential Trips

The other two times involved essential purchases. Both occurred the same week. The first was to a greenhouse nursery. The proprietor has a policy of appointment only and masks must be worn. I purchased about a dozen peppers. Even though I have a multitude of seedlings going, the peppers are necessary for my secret recipe salsa. And I have trouble getting peppers to grow from seed.

Then two days later I made the first trip to the grocery store in a month. What an experience! Now, the store has huge arrows on the floors directing the flow of traffic. Apparently, following the arrows is quite difficult for people to adjust to. Furthermore, only about half of the people wore the masks requested by the government.

I had heard tales in the media about shortages. Perhaps it was my lucky day, but there were only two items on my list unavailable; yeast and avocado. The milk was a little light and the expiration date quite close as well. Furthermore, a large amount of stock sat around the aisles waiting to fill shelf space. I just hope they had room for all of it!

Covid-19 Update

The latest case figures worldwide show over 3,000,000 cases with 214,583 deaths. Now many people will divide the number of deaths by the total cases. Easy math gives you the figure .07 (percent) of those infected have died. Not too worrying? Well, I am still worried because I do the math a little differently.

Of the 3,045,993 positive cases worldwide, only 1,006,102 are considered resolved. This terminology is important. A resolved case means an individual no longer has Covid-19. Obviously, there are two resolutions. The negative ending is reflected by the death count. Then, the remainder are those who battled Covid-19 and won.

However, using these figures in an easy math equation indicates a less satisfactory result. 214,583 divided by 1,006,102 equals .21 which gives one a rate of death triple of above. Furthermore, if this is extrapolated over the two million unresolved cases, the world could expect to lose about 640,000 lives to Covid-19—If and only if no one else tests positive.

Caveat for April 2020 Covid-19 Numbers

Please keep in mind a few things. First, not everyone will be tested. Therefore, one cannot say one-fifth of the population will die. The one in five number is only for confirmed, resolved cases. So, there is hope that better treatments may impact this number. However, my plan remains to avoid the virus.

Second, this calculation is based on worldwide numbers. Individual countries vary. If you would like to calculate your country both BNO News and Johns Hopkins University are compiling data. As of today, BNO News is still playing catch-up due to the death of a family member. But I like this online news agency out of the Netherlands because they started tracking stats very early on. The two organizations have different time zones so that also pushes the numbers apart. If you use JHU numbers, the ratio is .18. Rounding gives you the same one in five number.

April 2020 In the Garden

April 2020 showers were on the light side, so I have used soaker hoses to keep the garden alive. The temperatures have been about average. Although the weather forecast gave me a bit of a scare. Today an original temperature forecast of 96 degrees Fahrenheit and bright sun was slated. I am so glad the experts were wrong. At mid-afternoon it is 84 degrees Fahrenheit and partly cloudy. Perfect weather for transplanting.

While I did not have the nice two hour drizzle that accompanied the pepper transplanting, today was ideal. The plants I placed in the garden today were chosen from the seedlings I have started indoors this spring. Transplants include peanuts, basil, artichoke and my hybrid tomato favorite Heirloom Marriage Genuwine. I love these tomatoes but I do think the name is a bit confusing. Hybrids are not heirlooms and thus I won’t save seed from these tomatoes.

Hardening Off

My other tomatoes are still hardening off on the front porch along with more artichoke, basil, and dill. The cucumbers and beans are just now sprouting. I will wait a week or so before transplanting. Even though we are not quite past our last freeze date, the long-term forecast looks safe.

The hardening process can be tricky. Each day, plants are left outside in a protected area to become accustomed to Mother Nature. The goal is to lengthen the exposure daily. However, a few days ago we had a Red Flag Advisory. Since the wind can do so much damage, I skipped a day in the hardening off process.

Transplants that do not receive this gradual adjustment to the outdoors are vulnerable to loss. I would hate to waste two months of nurturing. So I am not rushing the process. The photos are of seedlings nearing the end of the process and/or the seeds started outdoors but in containers for later transplant.

Raised Row Garden

The raised row garden continues to astound. Please read this review of a great method of gardening. I managed to keep Swiss Chard alive all winter with a fabric hoop covering. Unfortunately, the recent high wind ripped the covering. Making lemonade, I just relocated half to protect some young cabbage seedlings.

Landscape Blanket
Protecting Beet Seeds From Starlings

I believe some pesky starlings have been enjoying my sweet beet seeds. So, I have now replanted a variety of beets for the third time. A light landscaping blanket now covers the seeds.

Cherry Blossoms
Cherry Tree in Full Bloom

Garlic and onions in various stages of growth are sprinkled throughout the garden. I have placed a small amount of garlic under the almond tree to help deter borers. The tree flowered for the first time; Just a sprinkling of blossoms as compared to the fully loaded cherry tree.

Early Harvest

April 2020 included bringing crops to the table. We enjoyed carrots twice. First just cut and boiled and the second time in a stir fry. I sow the carrot seed in late fall and they are among the first green shoots in the garden. We are also enjoying asparagus, Swiss chard, green onions, mint and lettuces. Egg-white frittatas with home grown produce cannot be beat.

April 2020 Hobby Room

The top for the Train Quilt 2 is fully pieced and waiting to be sandwiched. I love the circus theme of the border. The pastel colors are perfect for the little miss who might receive this on her first birthday. Additionally, I have settled on a pattern for the new baby who might be here for the next Wrap-Up. Another great- nephew to spoil.

But the time in the hobby room was also practical. Dozens of masks were made and then mailed to family members. My offspring live in large cities. The hope is the masks are enjoying use. They were quite easy to make and I kept one for myself. As stay-at-home restrictions ease, I believe I will still wear a mask in crowded situations. At least in the short term.

  • Quilt strips before sewing in mauve, blue gray and off white
    Beginnings of a quilt

April 2020 In The Kitchen

Covid-19 has one beneficial side effect. We are enjoying amazing meals. Even before the virus struck, we cooked most of the time. But the stay-at-home orders have created an abundance of extra time in the day-or so it seems. The result is fantastic recipes discovered or just remembered. A highlight of April 2020 was making sugar cookies for Easter as part of the Easter delivery meal.

I am a little concerned about the local yeast shortage. But, if I run out of regular yeast, I will turn to making sourdough bread. Additionally, I am thankful that my bread-making skills have improved so dramatically over the last few years. Soft home-made sandwich is preferable to the bricks I turned out early on. Bread Illustrated remains as my go-to cook book for bread recipes.

Fresh Bread
Fresh Bread

April 2020 In the Library

Just a couple short months ago I asked my librarian about online library loans. Her response was to download the Libby app. I did and I couldn’t live without it! While best sellers usually mean a wait, we both have enjoyed reading the various Lorena McCourtney books. She is a champ at writing cozy mysteries.

However, I do have some non-fiction books on hand. I have started three and have yet to finish one. Perhaps they do not offer the escape from reality I need. At least one of them is riddled with inconsistencies so that is also a factor.  Depending on how long this isolation lasts, I may find a way to finish each of them.

Three books
Reading in Progress

No Travel

Seldom do I have a month where I do not travel at least to a neighboring state. But April 2020 was a month without any travel. I love my corner of the world. But I also like to travel. I had hoped to recognize my Dad’s battle with breast cancer with an in person attendance at the Kentucky Oaks. But the first weekend in May is upon us. No running for Oaks Lilies or Kentucky Derby Roses will occur this spring.

Very few planes fly overhead. The Amtrak does pass through twice a day, but I have no idea how full it is. April 2020 brought a cancellation of the Centennial Zonta International Convention. So I will not be traveling to Chicago this July. No travel and no plans.

Thank you to all that made it through this long post. No venturing outside has cut down on my interaction with people so I jumped at this opportunity. I wish all of you good health. Carpe diem!

Procrastination Strikes Again

Here it is Thursday and my non-Friday post is yet to be written much less published across cyber space. I can only blame myself. I have plenty to write about and really don’t feel like I have writer’s block. Instead, this week I resemble the lady in this You Tube video on Age-Activated Attention Deficit Disorder. Click here to watch.

Long List of Things To-Do

Lettuce among onions in a garden
Five Star Lettuce

My list of projects seems unending. Spring has arrived. On the high plains spring is beautiful but all too short. The flies and the mosquitoes have not hatched so outdoor eating is delightful. We still have a danger of frost through Mother’s Day but cool weather crops can and have been started. Plus the garlic and onion sets planted last fall are maturing.

But there is also plenty of weeding and pruning on the to-do list. Plus our town hosts a clean-up weekend each spring. Volunteers, including students at the local community college, go around every street and remove yard debris, unwanted broken furniture, appliances and other cast-offs. This occurs next week, so that to-do has to be done.

Curtain To-Do List

The curtains still need to be made for the kitchen and breakfast room. But I have run into a snag. I normally work with cotton fabric. So I am having trouble adjusting to the knit I want to use for the drapes above the window. I like the effect of the soft material hanging from the rod.
Of course, much like the video above, I had to stop on making the drapes and curtains since I needed new rods. Living in such a small town, rods fitting my needs are not available. For those online shoppers reading this, I could not easily order online because the space between the window edge and the corner wall is only an inch and a half.

So the curtains were put off and thus no post on the kitchen redo-yet. Last week’s trip to Florida gave me an opportunity to physically see and measure the finials on new rods. On my way to the airport, a 200 mile drive, I stopped at a big box store and found some hardware that will work.

But, my drill is too big for the space. Now I need to stop and find a small hand-held one. I know I have one somewhere. Plus I need to find the charger. Yes I resemble the above video.

Miscellaneous To-Do List

I procrastinated 24-hours in contacting the powers that be at Miss USA. I want to interview one of their contestants for this blog. But first I need permission. I hope to hear back today. She is a small town girl from around these parts and has made the transition to life in the city. No small feat.

For those of you in the city, imagine growing up in a town so small that THERE ARE NO STOPLIGHTS! Now imagine this young lady competing in the Miss USA pageant. Dreams can come true.

Also on my to-do list is to get things organized enough in hopes of throwing a Kentucky Derby party. It is time to break out the mint julep recipe and find a Derby Hat. Plus, I picked up a horse based novel to read and review.

Easter

As a Christian, I celebrate the religious holiday of Easter. I am writing this on Maundy Thursday. This day commemorates the Last Supper. Since I am an alumnus of Albertus Magnus College, I have fond memories of Easter week. Not only was it a second spring break, but the campus truly rejoiced in the renewal.

This year I will not travel for the Easter feast. A relative in town is the hostess. So I am delighting in the fact I can stay home. My task is simple. Bring the pea salad and the rolls. One of the roll recipes is for soft gluten-free dinner rolls. I will share this on Saturday. If you are interested, the hardest to find ingredient is xanthan gum. The two flours used are rice and almond.

Plethora of Posts

The next month or so will bring a plethora of posts. In addition to writing about the Kentucky Derby party and the Miss USA contest there will be recipes, book reviews and garden tips. Unlike this week, I plan to spread out the information throughout the week. So look for posts on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at least through June.

My apologies to those of you on my email list who will receive messages three days in a row. I know that can be annoying. But the only time back-to back messages should come out this summer will be the end of the month wrap-ups.

Good luck to all of you with to-do lists. Remember, the word “no” can be used by those of us over the age of two. Happy Easter to all those who celebrate the season.