Rocky Mountain Fruit & Vegetable Garden Book Review

Rocky Mountain Fruit & Vegetable Garden is geared toward the states of Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah & Wyoming. But author Diana Maranhao is so knowledgeable about edible gardening you might want to pick up a copy even if you live in a different state. Since the book is geared toward the mountain west region, there are a few items such as the chart on average first and last frost dates that are not applicable for everyone. However most of the book contains useful information not limited to the Rocky Mountain area.

Maranhao divides the book into two sections. In the first section, the initial focus is on the states making up the Rocky Mountains in the U.S. For those residing here the above mentioned frost date chart along with detailed Zone maps of each state are a plus. Chapters 2 through 5 are useful for gardeners everywhere even though there are some location specific details.

Seasonal Gardening and Soil Composition

Chapters 2 and 3 yield tips and information on the basic conditions needed to grow a successful garden. The author explains how temperature extremes hinder crops. Then she suggests ways to mitigate the damage. Additionally, the author indicates which plants perform best as transplants and which need direct sowing.

The soil building chapter shares information generally found in good gardening texts. The section on composting did yield some suggestions I was not aware of. Maranhao does recommend soil testing utilizing local extension agencies for tool kits.

Planning, Planting & Growing

Chapters 4 and 5 cover the nuts and bolts of a garden. I really like the author’s approach. If I had a common sense guide such as Rocky Mountain Fruit & Vegetable Garden when I first started out, I think my failures would have been fewer. The planning and planting of the garden are spelled out in a non-verbose way.

The garden maintenance section advocates using a drip system. I concur. Much of the success of my raised row garden is due to the watering system. Maranhao gives details on differing drip systems. She also stresses the need to weed and monitor for pests.

Rocky Mountain Fruit and Vegetable Profiles

The second section of Rocky Mountain Fruit and Vegetable Gardening is a fantastic guide for the gardener as it pertains to specific plants. This portion is divided between fruit and nuts and vegetables and herbs.

Priority in planting is trees, bushes and vines. The author includes a chill chart which indicates the number of hours fruit trees need exposure to sub-45 degree air temperature. While I knew some cooler temperatures were needed, I did not know how many. Nor that winter thaws above 60 degrees Fahrenheit reverses the chill factor.

I also appreciated the illustrated diagrams on planting and pruning. Information on trellising plants is in this section as well. Other tips include a proper hardening off technique for transplants. Then the author turns to individual edibles.

The book organizes the information on the individual plants by dividing the specimens into cool and warm season groupings. Then, the seasonal plantings are listed alphabetically. Each of the listings has growing tips in addition to the basic questions (and answers) of who, what, where, when, and how to plant.

I added Rocky Mountain Fruit & Vegetable Gardening to my home library. The book is easy to use. Diana Maranhao is knowledgeable and writes with a style that is easy to follow. This book is a great resource especially for those living in the mountains, high valleys and high plains.

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