Tag: FEMA

After the Disaster-What happens then?

Responding After the Disaster

 

After the Disaster response is a topic not seen much in National Preparedness Month releases. Most of the time people talk about preparedness in terms of how to prepare for natural disasters. But, little is out there with information on what to do after the disaster occurs. What happens then? What are typical problems that arise?

Personal Safety and Wellness

The first thing to assess after the disaster occurs is personal safety and wellness. This will vary depending on the type of event. Currently in the United States, residents on the West Coast are dealing with fires while the Gulf Coast and the Atlantic seaboard are in the midst of hurricane season. Both situations have short and long term impacts. Immediate concerns revolve around human life. Long term repercussions are numerous and include clean-up, mitigation of loss and adjustment to new circumstances.

Wildfires

Fires produce a multitude of problems. In addition to the burn damage is the impact on air quality. Evacuation is essential if you live in the path of the fire. But many individuals may have underlying conditions that make smoke filled air difficult to breathe. Anyone in this category needs a supply of N-95 masks at the very least. Unfortunately, demand is high due to the concurring pandemic in 2020.

If you are not in the direct path of the fire, the air quality is still a problem. Air filters are needed for home, office and transportation. Instead of changing these filters after so many months, check often to ensure replacement occurs when needed.

Keep windows and doors closed tight. If you have an attached garage, after exiting the car, close the garage door before entering the house. Consolidate trips to reduce exposure.

Once the fire sweeps through an area, wait for the okay to return home. Why? Because hot pockets may exist. Also, routes in and out of an area may be compromised and firefighters need priority.

Clean up-After the Disaster of Fire

Ironically, a home that is not burned to the ground can cause more problems than one which is a total loss. A partially burned home is dangerous to inhabit if there is heavy smoke damage. Soot is a byproduct of fire and causes problems with both the respiratory and circulatory systems. In the long run, soot may contribute to cancer.

Therefore, cleaning indoor surface areas is one of the first things that need to happen after the disaster of a nearby fire. Ideally a professional company specializing in fire clean-up could be hired. But, if cost is prohibitive or demand too great and a company is not available, the clean-up can be done by the home owner. But I would not recommend this.

If you do choose to clean-up the fire damage on your own, please research the methods needed. There is more to cleaning soot than wiping away the grime while wearing a mask. Proper masking, good ventilation, and knowing the correct cleaning agents is essential.

Outside cleaning is also difficult. Embers may be present beneath charred wood or brush. Wildfires displace wild animals, so that is also a concern. Instinct drives animals to safety, but often that safe place is far from the original habitat. In cases of total destruction, the wildlife has to find new habitat. The current fires are pushing birds thousands of miles away.

Furthermore, burn scars can lead to future flooding. So long after the fire is put out, danger remains. The National Weather Service has excellent advice for those living near burn scars which you can access by clicking here.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are not just wind events. Flooding from tidal surge as well as from rain can do much damage. After the storm passes there are precautions to take while cleaning debris. Good work boots and heavy gloves are a must.

Wild animals are a key problem after a major flood producing storm. Rising waters push various animals out of their habitat. So, not only will mice, rats and other small animals seek shelter on dry land around homes, so will their predators. Snakes are a particular danger as they can blend in with the debris found along the outer edges of the high water marks. Gators have been found swimming in backyard pools. Seek help to relocate predatory animals.

In addition to the aforementioned boots and gloves, flood clean-up tools for outside the home include rakes and chain saws. The rakes can serve two purposes. First, they can pile the small branches and flood debris. Second, they serve as a distance tool for any snakes or other small creatures which may cause disease-especially those that succumb to the flooding.

Tree after hurricane cut up with chainsaw
Chainsaw was needed after the disaster of a hurricane.

The wind is not the only factor in trees falling. Waterlogged roots create instability. The combination can be deadly. Chain saws can make quick work of downed trees. This heavy equipment needs to be used by an experienced person. The chain saw itself can cause harm if used improperly.

Generators are also useful for after the disaster. Electrical outages are common after a major storm. While whole house generators which are wired directly into the home are ideal, they are also expensive. Portable generators are more cost effective but have several limitations. They are harder to use and proper storage of fuel as well as high fuel quantities needed create problems.

After the Disaster-Finances Needed

The best thing a person can do to prepare for the financial after effects of a natural disaster is to have a rainy day fund. While home and auto insurance is important, few policies cover all expenses after a disaster. Personal savings are a must. In a large event, Go Fund Me Pages will not be the solution. Individuals and families will need self-reliance.

A rainy day fund is not the same as investments in the stock market or real estate. Cash is king for emergencies. In my opinion, six months of expenses needs to be tucked away in a low interest savings, checking or money market account. Additionally, a limited amount of cash in small denominations along with some coin need to be carried with the person or in the home. By limited, maybe a week’s worth of expenses.

Electronic payments via credit or debit card will not work when the electricity goes out. Store clerks will often only do business with cash carrying customers. And there will be places not willing to open shop at all.

Building a rainy day fund will be the topic of next week’s post.